Worksheets and Whiteboard Resources for Elementary Math
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Math Topics K 5 Number Sense

Grade 3 (3.MD.C.5) Geometric measurement: understand concepts of area and relate area to multiplication and to addition.
Ages 9 - 11

Square O Saurus

SUPPORTS 3.MD.C.5: Recognize area as an attribute of plane figures and understand concepts of area measurement.

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Grade 3 (3.NBT.A.1) Use place value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit arithmetic.
Ages 7 - 8

Flight of the Frisbee

MEETS 3.NBT.A.1: Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100.

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Grade 3 (3.NBT.A.1) Use place value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit arithmetic.
Ages 8 - 10

Round to a Friend's

SUPPORTS 3.NBT.A.1: Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100.

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Grade 3 (3.NF.A.3) Develop understanding of fractions as numbers.
Ages 7 - 8

Tall Order

SUPPORTS 3.NF.A.3: Explain equivalence of fractions in special cases, and compare fractions by reasoning about their size.

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Grade 3 (3.OA.A.1) Represent and solve problems involving multiplication and division.
Ages 7 - 8

Spotty Dog Multiplication

SUPPORTS 3.OA.A.1: Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 × 7.

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Grade 4 (4.NBT.A.2) Generalize place value understanding for multi-digit whole numbers.
Ages 7 - 8

Bull's Eye

SUPPORTS 4.NBT.A.2: Read and write multi-digit whole numbers using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form. Compare two multi-digit numbers based on meanings of the digits in each place, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.

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Grade 4 (4.NBT.A.2) Generalize place value understanding for multi-digit whole numbers.
Ages 9 - 10

Talented Tetrahedrons

MEETS 4.NBT.A.2: Read and write multi-digit whole numbers using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form. Compare two multi-digit numbers based on meanings of the digits in each place, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.

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Grade 4 (4.NF.A.1)Extend understanding of fraction equivalence and ordering.
Ages 8 - 9

See Saw Fractions

SUPPORTS 4.NF.A.1: Explain why a fraction a/b is equivalent to a fraction (n × a)/(n × b) by using visual fraction models, with attention to how the number and size of the parts differ even though the two fractions themselves are the same size. Use this principle to recognize and generate equivalent fractions.

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Grade 4 (4.NF.A.1)Extend understanding of fraction equivalence and ordering.
Ages 8 - 9

Fraction patterns

SUPPORTS 4.NF.A.1: Explain why a fraction a/b is equivalent to a fraction (n × a)/(n × b) by using visual fraction models, with attention to how the number and size of the parts differ even though the two fractions themselves are the same size. Use this principle to recognize and generate equivalent fractions.

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Grade 4 (4.NF.A.1)Extend understanding of fraction equivalence and ordering.
Ages 8 - 10

Fraction Towers

MEETS 4.NF.A.1: Explain why a fraction a/b is equivalent to a fraction (n × a)/(n × b) by using visual fraction models, with attention to how the number and size of the parts differ even though the two fractions themselves are the same size. Use this principle to recognize and generate equivalent fractions.

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